All RPSE Newshttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/RSS feed for RPSE news urn:uuid:2df5c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2020/02/26/uw-madison-s-ruppar-named-co-editor-of-new-journal--inclusive-practices UW-Madison's Ruppar named co-editor of new journal, Inclusive PracticesUW-Madison Andrea Ruppar was recently named an inaugural co-editor of a new research-to-practice journal called Inclusive Practices. Ruppar is an associate professor with the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education.Wed, 26 Feb 2020 12:09:00 Z<p>UW-Madison Andrea Ruppar was recently named an inaugural co-editor of a new research-to-practice journal called Inclusive Practices.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/andrea-ruppar-250-px-sq.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Ruppar" displaymode="Original" title="Andrea Ruppar 250 px SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Ruppar </figcaption> </figure> </div> Ruppar is an associate professor of special education with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://rpse.education.wisc.edu/" title="RPSE website" target="_blank">Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>The journal is published by Sage, and is a publication of TASH, an international leader in disability advocacy.</p> <p>Inclusive Practices is a research-to-practice journal focused on lifespan issues for individuals with significant support needs. With topic areas ranging from inclusive education to human rights, this journal will serve as a companion to the TASH flagship research journal, Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities.&nbsp;</p> <p>Jennifer Kurth of the University of Kansas will serve as the other co-editor.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:c7f3c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2020/02/25/mueller-to-receive-outstanding-dissertation-award-from-inclusive-education-research-sig Mueller to receive Outstanding Dissertation Award from Inclusive Education Research SIGCarlyn Mueller is receiving an Outstanding Dissertation Award from AERA's Special and Inclusive Education Research SIG. Her dissertation is titled, “Beyond Stigma: Disability Identity in School Contexts.” Mueller, whose research is informed by her personal experience as a disabled scholar, will be joining the School of Education prior to the fall 2020 semester as an assistant professor with the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education.Tue, 25 Feb 2020 11:30:00 Z<p>Carlyn Mueller was recently selected to receive an Outstanding Dissertation Award from an American Educational Research Association (AERA) special interest group (SIG).</p> <p>She is being recognized by the Special and Inclusive Education Research SIG for her dissertation, &ldquo;Beyond Stigma: Disability Identity in School Contexts.&rdquo;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/carlyn-mueller.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Mueller" displaymode="Original" title="Carlyn Mueller" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Mueller</figcaption> </figure> </div> Mueller, whose research is informed by her personal experience as a disabled scholar, will be joining the School of Education prior to the fall 2020 semester as an assistant professor with the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education.</p> <p>Mueller&rsquo;s critical qualitative study that&rsquo;s being honored focuses on understanding disability identity development in special education. She explains that this dissertation research was done through a two-phase design, including both adults and students with disabilities in life history interviews and a photovoice project.</p> <p>Mueller notes that common shared identity experiences of the participants included: a lack of discussion of disability in curriculum and from special and general educators; attempts to distance themselves from the stigma of disability labeling in school; and participation in disability community only in adulthood.</p> <p>Her study supports the need to develop schools and instructional spaces that intentionally develop positive disability identity, which would have far-reaching impact on the academic and social experiences of students with disabilities in school.</p> <p>Mueller conducted this research while earning a Ph.D. in special education from the University of Washington in Seattle in August 2019. She currently is an Academic Pathways Postdoctoral Fellow at the Vanderbilt University.</p> <p>Mueller will be recognized and briefly present her work during the Special and Inclusive Education SIG&rsquo;s annual meeting, which takes part during the 2020 AERA Annual Meeting in San Francisco, which runs April 17-21.</p>urn:uuid:16f3c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2020/02/17/ruppar-receives--1-4m-grant-to-train-special-education-and-communication-sciences-and-disorders-students-together Ruppar receives $1.4M grant to train special education and communication sciences and disorders students togetherThe School of Education's Andrea Ruppar is the principal investigator for an innovative project that will train UW-Madison students how to work with young people who have complex communication needs.Mon, 17 Feb 2020 20:56:33 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Andrea Ruppar is the principal investigator (PI) on a new $1.4 million grant that will train students at the university how to work with young people who have complex communication needs over the next four years.</p> <p>Ruppar is an associate professor of special education with the School of Education&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="https://rpse.education.wisc.edu/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education</a>&nbsp;(RPSE). Kimber Wilkerson, a professor with RPSE and the faculty director of the School&rsquo;s Teacher Education Center, is a co-PI on this project along with Katie Hustad, a UW-Madison professor of communication sciences and disorders.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/andrea-ruppar-250-px-sq.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Ruppar" displaymode="Original" title="Andrea Ruppar 250 px SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Ruppar </figcaption> </figure> </div> The grant, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Education&rsquo;s Office of Special Education Programs, will allow the team to collaborate with local schools to provide practical experiences for 16 UW-Madison students studying communication sciences and disorders, and 16 students studying to become special education teachers.&nbsp;</p> <p>The UW-Madison students will learn about assessment, literacy, and communication instruction for young people who use augmentative and alternative communication in inclusive school settings. The UW-Madison students will gain hands-on experience in the UW Speech and Hearing Clinic, will have shared coursework and school-based practical experiences, and learn state-of-the-art interventions for communication instruction.</p> <p>Ruppar explains how students who have complex communication needs have disabilities that make verbal speech difficult. Examples include autism, apraxia of speech, cerebral palsy, intellectual disability, or multiple disabilities.</p> <p>&ldquo;Students with complex communication needs are more likely to be excluded from everyday school activities,&rdquo; says Ruppar. &ldquo;I am passionate about opening the doors of communication to students who do not speak to communicate, and I am thrilled to be able to collaborate with colleagues in communications sciences and disorders to pass that passion on to future educators. Through this partnership, we will be able to provide specific and intensive training to create a cohort of experts ready to transform education for learners who have always been on the margins of education.&rdquo;</p>urn:uuid:2ce9c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2020/01/16/winter-2019-20-edition-of-learning-connections-alumni-magazine-now-available Winter 2019-20 edition of Learning Connections alumni magazine now availableThe latest edition of Learning Connections, a news magazine from UW–Madison's School of Education, is now available online. The ​Winter 2019-20 issue is filled with exciting news about School of Education faculty, staff, students, and alumni. This edition puts the spotlight on the School's new Global Engagement Office and some of our efforts to think, partner, and innovate across the world.Thu, 16 Jan 2020 11:14:00 ZThe latest edition of Learning Connections, a news magazine from UW&ndash;Madison's School of Education, is now available&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections?mc_cid=39f63a2620&amp;mc_eid=[UNIQID]" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" data-auth="NotApplicable">online</a>. <br /> <br /> The ​Winter 2019-20 issue is filled with exciting news about School of Education faculty, staff, students, and alumni. This edition puts the spotlight on the School's new Global Engagement Office and some of our efforts to think, partner, and innovate across the world. (A pdf of the print version of the Winter 2019-20 Learning Connections is available&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/docs/WebDispenser/news-connections-pdf/soe_lc_winter2019-20-final.pdf?sfvrsn=4&amp;mc_cid=39f63a2620&amp;mc_eid=[UNIQID]" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" data-auth="NotApplicable">here</a>.)<br /> <span style="color: #9b7544; font-size: 14px;"><br /> Winter 2019-20 edition highlights include:</span> <p >&bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/message-from-the-dean" title="Message from the dean" target="_blank">Message&nbsp;from the Dean</a>: Diana Hess highlights the value of global connections<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/lynda-barry-genius-grant" title="Read about Lynda Barry" target="_blank">Trailblazers</a>: Lynda Barry, a creative force of nature with the Art Department, receives a "genius grant" from​ the MacArthur Foundation<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/new-program-sparks-student-passion" title="New course sparks passion in Charania" target="_blank">Voices</a>: Shehrose Charania explains how the new Health Promotion and Health Equity program lines up with her passion for patient advocacy and activism<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="http://" title="Read about MFA student Lianne Milton" target="_blank">Voices</a>: Lianne Milton, a documentary photographer and photojournalist who is pursuing a master of fine arts via the School of Education's Art Department, explains why she came to UW&ndash;Madison<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/voices-highlights" title="Learn about Omar Poler and Martina Rau" target="_blank">Voices</a>: Additional highlights<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/new-global-engagement-office" title="Read about the new Global Engagement Office" target="_blank">Building Global Community</a>: New Global Engagement Office bolstering efforts to connect across borders<br /> <br /> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/learning-connections-cover-winter-2019-20-350-px.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Learning Connections Cover Winter 2019-20 " title="Learning Connections Cover Winter 2019-20 350 px" class="FloatImageRight" />&bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/study-abroad" title="Learn about this Colombia study abroad course" target="_blank">Building Global Community</a>: Colombia study abroad experience opens eyes, expands mind<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/school-of-education-global-community.png?Status=Temp&amp;sfvrsn=2" title="View a visual of some example of the School's Global efforts" target="_blank">Building Global Community</a>: A sampling of the extensive global efforts by people associated with the School of Education<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/new-faculty-hires-2019-jpg.png?Status=Temp&amp;sfvrsn=2" title="View a graphic of the new faculty hires in 2019" target="_blank">News and Notes</a>: New faculty hires in 2019<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/university-theatre-2019-20-jpg.png?Status=Temp&amp;sfvrsn=2" title="2019-20 University Theatre schedule and graphic" target="_blank">News and Notes</a>: University Theatre 2019-20 schedule<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/news-and-notes" title="Read more news and notes" target="_blank">News and Notes</a>: Check out a range of highlights from across the School over the past six months<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/media-mentions" title="Check out these media mentions" target="_blank">Media Mentions</a>: ​Learn about ​some of the media outlets putting the spotlight on, and utilizing the expertise of, faculty and staff associated with the School<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/fighting-cancer-with-exercise" title="Learn about Lisa Cadmus-Bertram's research" target="_blank">Innovation</a>: Lisa Cadmus-Bertram with the Department of Kinesiology is researching the links between staying active and the decreased risk of chronic disease, particularly cancer<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/community-partnership" title="Check out this community, campus partnership" target="_blank">Innovation</a>: A community-campus partnership led by Stephen Quintana is strengthening mental health services for the Latinx community<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/school-mental-health-collaborative" title="Learn about the School Mental Health Collaborative" target="_blank">Innovation</a>: The new School Mental Health Collaborative is examining how best to support kids' social and emotional well-being<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/innovation-highlights" title="Check out these additional innovation highlights" target="_blank">Innovation</a>: ​Additional highlights&nbsp;<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/summer-in-madison-transforms-flanagan" title="Read about alumnus Eric Flanagan" target="_blank">Spotlight</a>: UW&ndash;Madison alumnus Eric Flanagan explains how a summer in Madison became a transformative experience<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/super-badgers" title="Read about the Super Badgers board game" target="_blank">Spotlight</a>: Classroom project leads to 'Super Badgers,' a new board game that introduces players to UW&ndash;Madison and its unique campus<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/alumni-breakouts" title="Check out these alumni highlights" target="_blank">Alumni breakouts</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/class-notes" title="Learn what your fellow alumni are up to" target="_blank">Class notes</a>: Check out what your fellow School of Education alumni are up to<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-20-winter/radical-pedagogy" title="Learn about the Radical Pedagogy opening" target="_blank">Alumni and Friends</a>: 'Radical Pedagogy' unveiled in new Lathrop Gallery Space thanks to gift from Jody Gottfried Arnhold and John Arnhold</p>urn:uuid:bfe1c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2020/01/09/internship-in-ecuador-deepens-love-for-education--spanish-language--and-other-cultures Internship in Ecuador deepens love for education, Spanish language, and other culturesHaleigh Slack, a UW-Madison senior who is double majoring in elementary and special education, interned as an English-as-a-foreign-language teacher and administrative assistant at Centro Ecuatoriano Norteamericano in Guayaquil, Ecuador during the summer of 2019. Slack taught and tutored adult students, served as a native English speaker for her organization, and helped revise some curriculum. The deadline for many summer 2020 international internships is Feb. 16, 2020.Thu, 09 Jan 2020 11:37:00 Z<p>Haleigh Slack, a UW-Madison senior who is double majoring in elementary and special education, interned as an English-as-a-foreign-language teacher and administrative assistant at Centro Ecuatoriano Norteamericano in Guayaquil, Ecuador during the summer of 2019.<br /> <br /> Slack taught and tutored adult students, served as a native English speaker for her organization, and helped revise some curriculum. </p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/slack-in-ecuador.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Slack in Ecuador" displaymode="Original" title="Slack in Ecuador" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Haleigh Slack, a UW-Madison senior who is double<br /> majoring in elementary and special education, spent the<br /> summer of 2019 in Guayaquil, Ecuador.&nbsp;</figcaption> </figure> </div> &ldquo;While at times my responsibilities challenged me, I truly grew as a future educator and as a professional,&rdquo; says Slack. </p> <p>Slack spent her weekends exploring different parts of Ecuador. She deepened her knowledge of Ecuadorian culture by living with a host family and spending time with coworkers, students, and other interns. Her internship in Ecuador not only gave her teaching experience, it helped her become a &ldquo;culturally competent citizen of our world.&rdquo; </p> <p>Slack recognizes that many students might not think an international internship is accessible to them.&nbsp; </p> <p>"For School of Education students, I know it can sometimes be difficult to go abroad with many professional programs with specific coursework, but the <a href="https://internships.international.wisc.edu/">International Internship Program</a> (IIP) Office was exactly what I needed,&rdquo; says Slack. "I was able to go over the summer. I received a grant from IIP and a stipend every month from my organization and lived with a host family. Living in Ecuador for two months was completely doable."</p> <p>&ldquo;Haleigh Slack is a wonderful example of a student who utilized the incredible resources that UW-Madison offers to students in pursuing international internships,&rdquo; says Kate McCleary, associate director of the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://merit-www.education.wisc.edu/global/">Global Engagement Office</a>. &nbsp;&ldquo;She took the time to research how to pursue an international and intercultural experience, and now has incredible stories to share from her teaching experience in Ecuador and to include on her resume.&rdquo; </p> <p>Slack&rsquo;s time in Ecuador deepened her love for education, the Spanish language, and learning about other cultures. She shared that interning in Ecuador, &ldquo;Opened up my eyes to other opportunities to teach abroad after graduation and instilled a passion in me to learn and grow in cultures different from my own.&rdquo; </p> <p>&bull; <em>The deadline for many summer 2020 international internships is Feb. 16, 2020. Join the International Internship Program Office and the School of Education&rsquo;s Career Center for an informational meeting on international internships on Thursday, Feb. 6, from 5 to 6 p.m. in room L138 of the <a href="https://map.wisc.edu/s/uay0x9lz" title="View the Education Building's campus map location" target="_blank">Education Building</a>.</em></p> <p><em>For additional information, visit the International Internships Programs website: <a href="https://internships.international.wisc.edu/">https://internships.international.wisc.edu/</a></em></p>urn:uuid:6be1c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2020/01/06/bell-named-next-director-of-wisconsin-center-for-education-research Bell named next director of Wisconsin Center for Education ResearchCourtney Bell will become the next director of the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER), UW–Madison School of Education Dean Diana Hess announced Monday, Jan. 6. Bell, who is currently a principal research scientist with Educational Testing Service (ETS), the world’s largest private, nonprofit educational testing and assessment organization, will begin her new position July 1.Mon, 06 Jan 2020 15:30:00 Z<p>Courtney Bell will become the next director of the <a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/" title="Visit the WCER home page" target="_blank">Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER)</a>, UW&ndash;Madison School of Education Dean Diana Hess announced Monday.</p> <p>Bell, who is currently a principal research scientist with Educational Testing Service (ETS), the world&rsquo;s largest private, nonprofit educational testing and assessment organization, will begin her new position July 1.</p> <p>&ldquo;I am thrilled that Dr. Bell will be joining the School of Education as director of WCER,&rdquo; says School of Education Dean Diana Hess. &ldquo;She is an extraordinary educational leader and researcher. Her background as a high school teacher, a faculty member, a leader of complex and innovative research teams and projects, and principal researcher with ETS uniquely prepares her to be an excellent leader of WCER. I look forward to working with her.&rdquo;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/courtney-bell-180-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Courtney Bell WCER" displaymode="Original" title="Courtney Bell 180 px" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption"> Bell </figcaption> </figure> </div> Bell has worked at ETS since 2008, when she was hired as an associate research scientist within the Research and Development Division&rsquo;s Teaching and Learning Research Group. Over the past decade, Bell has taken on increasing responsibilities within ETS, and since 2018 has served as a principal research scientist with the Research and Development Division&rsquo;s Global Assessment Center. ETS houses a team of education experts, researchers, and assessment developers dedicated to advancing quality and equity in education across the world. </p> <p>&ldquo;Through research and innovation, WCER colleagues are working every day to improve our understanding of education for the next generation of citizens. I am honored to have the opportunity to work alongside such committed and gifted colleagues,&rdquo; says Bell. &ldquo;I am especially excited to continue the collaborative, interdisciplinary work I have always enjoyed with colleagues in the School of Education and the broader community.&rdquo;</p> <p>Bell has played a leading role in several significant, externally funded national and international research projects focused on teacher evaluation, the measurement of teaching, and its relationship to student growth and development. She notes that, by design, most of these multi-million-dollar projects have been cross-disciplinary and collaborative. </p> <p>As a senior researcher within a larger organization, Bell has been a primary generator of new knowledge and has taken the lead in applying that expertise and capability to existing and new ETS products and services. This leadership work has included setting substantive research and development goals, priorities, and policies for ETS, in addition to policy, planning, and management of work with external clients. </p> <p>Bell has led the internal research agenda for the study of teaching at ETS, with input from senior management, for more than six years. She also co-led the conceptualization, launch, and development of the Understanding Teaching Quality Center, which supports research and development related to measuring various aspects of teaching. She directed the center from 2014-16, which included supervisory responsibilities for research scientists, administrative staff, project managers, and research associates.</p> <p>Bell received her Ph.D. in curriculum, teaching, and educational policy from Michigan State University after previously earning secondary chemistry teaching certification from East Carolina University and an undergraduate degree in chemistry from Dartmouth College. She started her education career as a high school science teacher in North Carolina in 1996 before holding several teaching and research positions at Columbia University, Michigan State, and the University of Connecticut over the next decade. </p> <p>With more than 500 faculty, academic staff, and students, plus annual expenditures of more than $80 million, WCER is one of the oldest, largest, and most influential university-based education research centers in the United States. Housed within the School of Education and founded in 1964, WCER&rsquo;s research and dissemination activities are diverse and international in scope, with funding from a variety of federal agencies, private foundations, and public service agencies. </p> <p>The center is home to about 120 grant-funded projects and also includes a significant fee-for-service portfolio that includes WIDA, a global leader in assessments, standards, and training for educators of multilingual learners.</p> <p>&ldquo;WCER has a long and distinguished history of research and innovation that improves educational outcomes for all young people,&rdquo; says Bell. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s an exciting place for me to continue to learn and work to improve education.&rdquo;</p> <p>Reporting to the dean of the School of Education, Bell is being called upon to provide exceptional organizational leadership that encourages innovation, provides first-rate service to researchers in the center, and supports the growth of both the research and fee-for-service missions of the center. Bell is also being tasked with ensuring that WCER continues to provide undergraduate and graduate students with meaningful opportunities to hone their research skills.</p> <p>Bell was selected to lead WCER following a national search that brought three finalists to campus in December to participate in public forums and meet with faculty, staff, and School of Education leadership. The finalists were selected by a 13-member search-and-screen committee co-chaired by WIDA Executive Director Tim Boals and Percival Matthews, an associate professor with the Department of Educational Psychology and a WCER researcher.</p>urn:uuid:c4cbc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/11/21/uw-madison-s-tansey-conducting-studies-on-how-best-to-support-employment-of-youth-with-disabilities UW-Madison’s Tansey conducting studies on how best to support employment of youth with disabilitiesTim Tansey, an associate professor with the School of Education’s Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education, will serve as the principal investigator (PI) on the UW-Madison sub-awards for two major new grant-funded projects. Virginia Commonwealth University Professor Paul Wehman is the PI on the two five-year, $4.4 million awards (total funding of $8.8 million) from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research in the U.S Department of Health and Human Services.Thu, 21 Nov 2019 11:30:00 Z<p>Tim Tansey, an associate professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="https://rpse.education.wisc.edu/" target="_blank" title="RPSE website">Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education</a>, will serve as the principal investigator (PI) on the UW-Madison sub-awards for two major new grant-funded projects.</p> <p>Virginia Commonwealth University Professor Paul Wehman is the PI on the two five-year, $4.4 million awards (total funding of $8.8 million) from the&nbsp;<a href="https://acl.gov/about-acl/about-national-institute-disability-independent-living-and-rehabilitation-research">National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research</a>&nbsp;in the U.S Department of Health and Human Services. VCU will lead and coordinate a dozen studies across four universities, including Vanderbilt University and Kent State University, to conduct research on how to improve vocational readiness and employment outcomes for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, as well as transition-age youth with disabilities.<br /> <br /> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/1089_dsc_7566.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Tim Tansey" displaymode="Original" title="1089_DSC_7566" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Tansey </figcaption> </figure> </div> Wehman is known for his pioneering work in the beginning of supported employment in 1980, a rehabilitation intervention strategy that has helped millions of people with neurodevelopmental disabilities, brain injury, mental illness, and spinal cord injury in countries around the world gain competitive employment.&nbsp;</p> <p>In addition to Tansey, the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC)&nbsp;on Employment of Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD), under the project direction of Valerie Brooke (VCU), includes Fong Chan as the co-PI and Catherine Anderson and Ellie Hartman as co-investigators on the UW&ndash;Madison subaward. The RRTC on Employment of Transition Age Individuals with Disabilities project is under the direction of Elizabeth Getzel (VCU), with Anderson as a co-PI and Hartman as co-investigator.&nbsp;</p> <p>For the RRTC on Employment of Persons with Intellectual and Development Disabilities project, researchers at UW-Madison will conduct a study to identify the efficacy of a blended learning intervention program (TECH-Prep) to increase technology career interests and career readiness of African-American youth with developmental disabilities.</p> <p>The TECH-Prep program combines mentoring by professionals in STEM fields, training in basic coding, and paid internships with technology companies. Successful implementation of the program has the potential to identify new pathways of service delivery for vocational rehabilitation counselors and overall vocational achievement for you with IDD.</p> <p>The RRTC on Employment of Transition-Age Youth with Disabilities project seeks to identify best practices for supporting transition-age youth with disabilities in the workplace. Researchers will conduct qualitative case studies of youth with disabilities, their families, service providers, and their employers to better understand their lived experiences. The goals of this project are to identify the barriers to and facilitators of outcomes for transition-age youth with disabilities, as well as identifying existing practices, programs, or policies that are associated with employment outcomes.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:2bb8c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/10/22/uw-madison-s-smedema-is-project-director-for-rehabilitation-services-administration-grant UW-Madison’s Smedema is project director for Rehabilitation Services Administration grantUW-Madison’s Susan Miller Smedema is the project director for a new grant that’s designed to bolster the number of qualified vocational rehabilitation (VR) counselors across Wisconsin and the nation. The award is for a Long Term Training Grant from the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA). The project will grant scholarship support for students in the highly ranked master’s degree program in clinical rehabilitation counseling at UW-Madison, which is directed by Smedema. With a grant of $1 million over five years, a total of 50 students will benefit from this award. Tue, 22 Oct 2019 10:22:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Susan Miller Smedema is the project director for a new grant that&rsquo;s designed to bolster the number of qualified vocational rehabilitation (VR) counselors across Wisconsin and the nation.&nbsp;</p> <p>The award is for a Long Term Training Grant from the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA).&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/smedema.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Smedema" displaymode="Original" title="Smedema" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Smedema </figcaption> </figure> </div> The project will grant scholarship support for students in the highly ranked master&rsquo;s degree program in clinical rehabilitation counseling at UW-Madison, which is directed by Smedema. With a grant of $1 million over five years, a total of 50 students will benefit from this award.&nbsp;</p> <p>"We are thrilled to be able to provide scholarships to our students for the next five years through this RSA grant,&rdquo; says Smedema, an associate professor with the School of Education's Department oof Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education. &ldquo;Our students are absolutely phenomenal, and are passionate about helping improve the lives of individuals with disabilities and chronic illnesses. They are well deserving of the financial support that this grant will provide them.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>For more than 60 years, this program has been successful in producing graduates who have gone on to careers in rehabilitation counseling, facilitating the employment of people with disabilities and improvements in their quality of life. Many graduates have become leaders within the profession.&nbsp;</p> <p>Smedema explains that this initiative will increase the supply&nbsp;of rehabilitation counselors for employment in state vocational rehabilitation agencies.&nbsp;</p> <p>This will be accomplished through the recruiting, training, and placement of people, including individuals from underrepresented groups, in professional positions in state vocational rehabilitation and related agencies. Students will also have the opportunity to work with cooperating agencies and programs that provide practicum and internship experiences, including the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development.</p> <p>Please visit&nbsp;<a href="https://rsa.ed.gov/display.cfm?pageid=15" target="_blank" title="RSA grant info 1">these</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://rsa.ed.gov/display.cfm?pageid=39" target="_blank" title="RSA grant info 2">links</a>&nbsp;for more information about the RSA Training Grant Program.</p>urn:uuid:36b8c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/10/22/uw-madison-s-ruppar-selected-to-receive-tash-early-career-research-award UW-Madison’s Ruppar selected to receive TASH Early Career Research AwardUW-Madison’s Andrea Ruppar has been selected to receive the TASH 2019 Early Career Researcher Network Award. Ruppar is an associate professor with the School of Education’s Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education (RPSE). Her scholarship focuses on building the capacity of schools and teachers to provide meaningful, evidence-based, inclusive education for students with the most significant disabilities —including multiple disabilities, intellectual disability, and autism. The TASH Early Career Researcher Network Award is focused on promoting the development and dissemination of evidence-based practices, and the support and mentorship of new researchers. Tue, 22 Oct 2019 10:02:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Andrea Ruppar has been selected to receive the TASH 2019 Early Career Researcher Network Award.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/ruppar-andrea.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Andrea Ruppar" displaymode="Original" title="Ruppar, Andrea" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Ruppar </figcaption> </figure> </div> Ruppar is an associate professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://rpse.education.wisc.edu/" title="RPSE website" target="_blank">Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education (RPSE)</a>. <br /> <br /> Her scholarship focuses on building the capacity of schools and teachers to provide meaningful, evidence-based, inclusive education for students with the most significant disabilities &mdash;including multiple disabilities, intellectual disability, and autism.<br /> <br /> The TASH Early Career Researcher Network Award is focused on promoting the development and dissemination of evidence-based practices, and the support and mentorship of new researchers.&nbsp;</p> <p>In her recent work, Ruppar has examined topics such as adolescents&rsquo; access to literacy and communication, and the role of teachers in promoting access and involvement in the general curriculum. A former K-12 special educator, she is particularly interested in the influence of the social context of teachers&rsquo; workplaces on decision-making.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Ruppar also recently led UW-Madison's efforts to join a new group of higher education leaders from around the country being brought together to examine ways to help school districts address the critical problem of recruiting and retaining special education teachers. </p> <p>Ruppar will receive the award at the TASH membership luncheon on Dec. 7.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:849ec237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/09/10/rosenthal-assuming-presidency-of-national-council-on-rehabilitation-education Rosenthal assuming presidency of National Council on Rehabilitation EducationUW–Madison’s David Rosenthal will become president of the National Council on Rehabilitation Education (NCRE) in October. Rosenthal is a professor with the School of Education’s Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education. Tue, 10 Sep 2019 10:32:00 Z<p>UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s David Rosenthal will become president of the National Council on Rehabilitation Education (NCRE) in October.</p> <p>Rosenthal is a professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://rpse.education.wisc.edu/" title="RPSE home apge" target="_blank">Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education</a>, which he chaired from 2007-11. He also served as associate dean of curriculum and international affairs in the School of Education from 2012-16.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/david-rosenthal-250-px-sq.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="David Rosenthal" displaymode="Original" title="David Rosenthal 250 px SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Rosenthal</figcaption> </figure> </div> Rosenthal&rsquo;s primary areas of interest in research include supported employment, psychiatric rehabilitation, clinical judgment and decision making in rehabilitation counseling, clinical bias, cross cultural and diversity issues, and international rehabilitation. He was named NCRE&rsquo;s Rehabilitation Researcher of the Year in 2005.</p> <p>According to the NCRE <a href="https://ncre.org/" title="NCRE website" target="_blank">website</a>: &ldquo;The National Council on Rehabilitation Education (NCRE) is the premier professional organization of educators dedicated to quality services for persons with disabilities through education and research. NCRE advocates up-to-date education and training and the maintenance of professional standards in the field of rehabilitation.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Originally formed in 1955, NCRE today includes more than 450 members from over 100 different institutions of higher education.</p>urn:uuid:8198c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/08/28/school-greeting-13-new-faculty-members-at-welcome-back-bash-aug--29 School of Education greets 13 new faculty membersUW-Madison’s School of Education celebrated the start of the 2019-20 academic year with its annual Welcome Back Bash event on Thursday, Aug. 29. And once again, the School ​welcomed a large cohort of new faculty members, with 13 talented scholars joining the School of Education’s roster since the start of 2019 — with many of those arriving just in time for the start of the new academic year.Wed, 28 Aug 2019 10:38:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s School of Education celebrated the start of the 2019-20 academic year with its annual Welcome Back Bash event on Thursday, Aug. 29.</p> <p>And once again, the School welcomed a large cohort of new faculty members, with 13 talented scholars joining the School of Education&rsquo;s roster since the start of 2019 &mdash; with many of those arriving just in time for the start of the new academic year.</p> <h3>New faculty members are:</h3> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/brian-burt-115-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Brian Burt" title="Brian Burt 115 px" class="FloatImageLeft" style="float: left;" />&bull; Brian A. Burt, assistant professor, Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis:&nbsp;</strong>Since 2014, Burt has served as an assistant professor at Iowa State University. His research, which has received major funding from the National Science Foundation and the National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship, examines policies and practices that influence students&rsquo; educational and workforce pathways. In particular, Burt looks to understand and improve the experiences of black men in STEM graduate programs. Burt was recently featured by Diverse Issues in Higher Education as a &ldquo;2019 Emerging Scholar.&rdquo; He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan&rsquo;s Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education in 2014.</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/luis-columna-115-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Luis Columna" title="LUIS-COLUMNA-115 px" class="FloatImageLeft" />&bull; Luis Columna, associate professor, Department of Kinesiology:&nbsp;</strong>The native of Puerto Rico previously worked for eight years as a faculty member with Syracuse University&rsquo;s Department of Exercise Science. An advocate for social justice and diversity, Columna&rsquo;s work centers on improving physical activity opportunities for children with disabilities, particularly in Hispanic families. Columna has published two books and written numerous peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters.&nbsp;&nbsp;He developed the Fit Families Program, which brings together children with disabilities, their parents, college students, and in-service professionals from a range of fields. Columna earned his Ph.D. from Texas Women&rsquo;s University in 2007.</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/beth-fields-115-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Beth Fields" title="Beth Fields 115 px" class="FloatImageLeft" />&bull; Beth Fields, assistant professor, Department of Kinesiology:</strong>&nbsp;Fields has spent the past two years conducting post-doctoral work at the University of Pittsburgh. A widely published scholar, her research examines animal-assisted approaches for aging adults with chronic conditions, and systems and methods designed to improve person and family-centered geriatric care. Fields hopes to grow her interdisciplinary collaborations to help transform quality geriatric service delivery. Fields is an alumna of the UW&ndash;Madison School of Education, earning her undergraduate degree in rehabilitation psychology in 2012. She earned a master&rsquo;s (2014) in occupational therapy and a Ph.D. (2017) in occupation and rehabilitation science from Colorado State University.</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/mark-h-115-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Mark H" title="Mark H 115 px" class="FloatImageLeft" />&bull; Mark Hairston (Mark H.), assistant professor, Department of Theatre and Drama:&nbsp;</strong>Mark H. is a director, performer, and educator with a primary focus on American theater and theater of the African diaspora. He is particularly drawn to classic works, innovative literary adaptation, site-specific performance, and theater for community development. Mark H. has worked extensively as a theater professional with some of the nation&rsquo;s leading artists and theater companies. He received his MFA in directing from Columbia University, his BFA in acting from Rutgers University, and was classically trained at Shakespeare&rsquo;s Globe Theatre in London.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;<img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/duane-lee-holland-jr-115-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Duane Lee Holland Jr. " title="Duane Lee Holland Jr. 115 px" class="FloatImageLeft" />&bull; Duane Lee Holland, Jr., assistant professor, Dance Department:&nbsp;</strong>Holland previously served as an associate professor of dance at Boston Conservatory at Berklee. His professional background includes performing with some of the top hip-hop and modern dance choreographers in the world. Holland also has worked as the assistant artistic director of Rennie Harris Puremovement, the first theatrical hip-hop dance company in the U.S., and performed in the original cast of &ldquo;The Lion King&rdquo; on Broadway. Holland was a guest artist on campus with the Dance Department last October and holds a master of fine arts in choreography from Iowa University.</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/kirchgasler-christopher-115-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Kirchgasler Christopher" title="Kirchgasler-Christopher 115 px" class="FloatImageLeft" />&bull; Christopher Kirchgasler, assistant professor, Department of Curriculum and Instruction:&nbsp;</strong>Kirchgasler arrives on campus after spending two years as a faculty member with the University of Kansas&rsquo; Department of Curriculum and Teaching. His award-winning research examines the historical, ethnographic, and comparative qualities of schooling, particularly as they relate to notions of inclusion, equity, and justice. His work directs attention to how contemporary school reforms are &ldquo;haunted&rdquo; by colonial residues that define who and what are seen and acted on as the &ldquo;problems&rdquo; of individual and social development.</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/kirchgasler_kathryn-l_prov-02685_1702685_aug-15_8x12.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Kathryn Kirchgasler" title="Kirchgasler_Kathryn L_PROV-02685_1702685_Aug 15_8x12" class="FloatImageLeft" style="float: left;" />&bull; Kathryn Kirchgasler, assistant professor, Department of Curriculum and Instruction:&nbsp;</strong>Kirchgasler will be joining the department after two years as a faculty member with the University of Kansas&rsquo; Department of Curriculum and Teaching. She studies how science education carries cultural norms and racialized assumptions that undermine commitments to equality and justice. Her research examines dangers in seeking to include underrepresented groups today without considering how those approaches resemble strategies targeting immigrant and colonized groups over the past century. Her next project explores recent reforms that aim to promote health equity through redressing disparities in STEM education.</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/mollie-mcquillian-115-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="mollie mcquillian " title="mollie-mcquillian 115 px" class="FloatImageLeft" />&bull; Mollie McQuillan, assistant professor, Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis:&nbsp;</strong>McQuillan comes to the School of Education after earning her Ph.D. this summer from Northwestern University&rsquo;s Human Development and Social Policy Program. McQuillan received both a National Academy of Education/Spencer Dissertation Fellowship (2017) and a Northwestern University Presidential Fellowship, which is Northwestern&rsquo;s most prestigious and competitive fellowship for doctoral students, to complete her Ph.D. work. McQuillan's mixed-methods research examines the intersection of educational policy, organizational practices, and the health of gender-expansive students. She also has almost a decade of experience as a public school teacher.</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/darcy-padilla-115-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Darcy Padilla" title="Darcy Padilla 115 px" class="FloatImageLeft" />&bull; Darcy Padilla, assistant professor, Art Department:&nbsp;</strong>Padilla joins the School of Education as a faculty member after previously serving as a visiting instructor of photography with the Art Department for the past year. She is a highly regarded documentary photographer who has won multiple major photography awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship and a W. Eugene Smith grant. Padilla earned her master of fine arts degree from the University of California, Davis, and holds an undergraduate degree in journalism from San Francisco State University.</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/diana-rodriguez-gomez-115-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Diana Rodriguez-Gomez " title="Diana Rodriguez-Gomez 115 px" class="FloatImageLeft" />&bull; Diana Rodr&iacute;guez G&oacute;mez, assistant professor, Department of Educational Policy Studies:&nbsp;</strong>Rodr&iacute;guez-G&oacute;mez will be joining the School of Education after serving since 2016 as an assistant professor at the Universidad de Los Andes, in her hometown of Bogot&aacute;, Colombia. Rodr&iacute;guez-G&oacute;mez earned her doctorate in international educational development from Columbia University&rsquo;s Teachers College in 2016. Rodr&iacute;guez-G&oacute;mez&rsquo;s expertise explores the intersections of violence and education in Latin America, and her research includes forced migration, armed conflict, peacebuilding and education, and education in emergencies.</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/diego-roman-115-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Diego Roman" title="Diego Roman 115 px" class="FloatImageLeft" />&bull; Diego Rom&aacute;n, assistant professor, Department of Curriculum and Instruction:&nbsp;</strong>Rom&aacute;n is an expert on bilingual/bicultural education who has worked as an assistant professor at Southern Methodist University since 2015. He holds a BS in agronomy from Zamorano University in Honduras, an MS in curriculum and instruction from UW&ndash;Whitewater, and an MS in biology, MA in linguistics and Ph.D. in educational linguistics, all from Stanford University. Prior to Stanford, he taught middle school science to emergent bilinguals and newcomer students, first in rural Wisconsin and then in San Francisco. Rom&aacute;n&rsquo;s research is located at the intersection of linguistics, science education, and environmental studies.</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/jeremy-stoddard-115-px1e99c237c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Jeremy Stoddard" title="Jeremy Stoddard 115 px" class="FloatImageLeft" />&bull; Jeremy Stoddard, associate professor, Department of Curriculum and Instruction:&nbsp;</strong>Stoddard, who earned a Ph.D. (2006) and master&rsquo;s degree (2001) from the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, returned to UW&ndash;Madison after spending more than a decade as a faculty member at William and Mary, where he chaired the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and was the founding director of the interdisciplinary program in educational studies. His research examines the role of media in teaching and learning history and democratic citizenship &mdash; with a particular focus on engaging with difficult or marginalized histories and contemporary controversial issues.</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/trezek_115-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Beverly Trezek" title="trezek_115 px" class="FloatImageLeft" />&bull; Beverly Trezek, associate professor and the Morgridge Chair in Reading, Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education:&nbsp;</strong>Trezek returns to the School of Education after earning both her master&rsquo;s (1997) and Ph.D. (2004) in special education from UW&ndash;Madison. Since 2005, she has worked as a faculty member with the Department of Counseling and Special Education in DePaul University&rsquo;s College of Education. Trezek is a former special education teacher in the Madison schools and a widely published researcher whose work centers on reading and literacy development in deaf children. In 2017 she received the Excellence in Research Award from DePaul University&rsquo;s College of Education.</p> <p>The School also welcomed several new leaders who have joined the School in the past year, including: LaVar Charleston, associate dean for diversity and inclusion; Kristen Hendrickson, chief financial officer; Earlise Ward, faculty director of the Morgridge Center for Public Service; Rebecca Dopart, the director of PLACE; Brenna Graham, the director of development for foundation relations;&nbsp;and Li-Ching Ho (Department of Curriculum and Instruction) and Adam Nelson (Department of Educational Policy Studies), co-directors of the School&rsquo;s Global Engagement Office.</p>urn:uuid:2389c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/08/07/uw-madison-s-bishop-reflects-on-time-with-university-of-kentucky-s-human-development-institute UW-Madison’s Bishop reflects on time with University of Kentucky’s Human Development InstituteUW-Madison’s Malachy Bishop was featured in an interview from the University of Kentucky’s Human Development Institute (HDI). Bishop is the Norman L. and Barbara M. Berven Professor of Rehabilitation Psychology with the School of Education’s Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education. Bishop is also the former HDI director of research and development, holding that role from 2014 until 2018, when he took his current position at UW-Madison. Today, he still collaborates with HDI on some projects. Wed, 07 Aug 2019 10:31:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Malachy Bishop was featured in an interview from the University of Kentucky&rsquo;s Human Development Institute (HDI).&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/malachy-bishop.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Malachy Bishop" displaymode="Original" title="Malachy Bishop" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption"> Bishop </figcaption> </figure> </div> Bishop is the Norman L. and Barbara M. Berven Professor of Rehabilitation Psychology with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://rpse.education.wisc.edu/" title="RPSE home page" target="_blank">Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education</a>. </p> <p>Bishop is also the former HDI director of research and development, holding that role from 2014 until 2018, when he took his current position at UW-Madison. Today, he still collaborates with HDI on some projects.&nbsp;</p> <p>He remembers his time at HDI fondly, telling the University of Kentucky that he enjoyed opportunities to involve students from diverse academic backgrounds with the work and mission of HDI and see how they informed and expanded the work with their own contributions.&nbsp;</p> <p>Read the full interview <a href="https://www.hdi.uky.edu/news/hdi-spotlight-on-malachy-bishop" title="HDI interview" target="_blank">here</a>.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:6881c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/06/28/summer-2019-edition-of-learning-connections-now-available-online Summer 2019 edition of Learning Connections now available onlineThe latest edition of Learning Connections, an alumni news magazine from the UW-Madison School of Education, is now available online. The ​Summer 2019 issue is filled with exciting news about School of Education faculty, staff, students, and alumni. The cover stories are focused on Connecting with Community, and the School's efforts to explore new possibilities, engage diverse voices, and improve lives.Fri, 28 Jun 2019 11:01:00 Z<p>The latest edition of <strong><em>Learning Connections</em></strong>, an alumni news magazine from the UW-Madison School of Education, is <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections" title="Check out the online edition of Learning Connections" target="_blank">now available online</a>.<br /> <br /> The ​Summer 2019 issue is filled with exciting news about School of Education faculty, staff, students, and alumni. <br /> <br /> The cover stories are focused on Connecting with Community, and the School's efforts to explore new possibilities, engage diverse voices, and improve lives.<br /> <br /> A pdf of the latest print edition of Learning Connections is&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/docs/WebDispenser/news-connections-pdf/final-lc-summer-19-pdf-for-web.pdf?sfvrsn=4" title="View a pdf of the Summer 2019 Learning Connections" target="_blank">available here</a>.</p> <h3>Summer 2019 edition highlights include:</h3> <p>&bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/message-from-the-dean" title="Read the message from the Dean" target="_blank">Message&nbsp;from the Dean</a>: Diana Hess highlights the value of community</p> <p>&bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/enright-forgiveness" title="Learn about Enright's Forgiveness work" target="_blank">Voices</a>: Robert Enright travels globe spreading news about his groundbreaking forgiveness work<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/original-warrior-exhibit" title="Learn about the Original Warrior exhibit" target="_blank">Voices</a>: Toms Jones and John Hitchcock share their perspectives via their work being featured in the 'Original Warrior' exhibit at the National Veterans Art Museum<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/closing-remarks" title="Hear from some graduating students" target="_blank">Voices</a>: Closing Remarks from 2019 spring graduates<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/additional-voices-highlights" title="Learn more" target="_blank">Voices</a>: Additional highlights<br /> <br /> <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/docs/WebDispenser/news-connections-pdf/final-lc-summer-19-pdf-for-web.pdf?sfvrsn=4" title="View a pdf of the print Learning Connections" target="_blank"><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/learning-connections-summer-2019-cover-350-px.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Cover of the Summer 2019 Learning Connections" title="Learning Connections Summer 2019 Cover 350 px" class="FloatImageRight" /></a>&bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/evaluation-and-policy-clinics" title="Read the cover story about the evaluation and policy clinics" target="_blank">Connecting with Community</a>: Evaluation and policy clinics give graduate students such as Anthony Hernandez (on the cover of this issue of&nbsp;<em>Learning Connections</em>) opportunities to build partnerships and connect research to practice<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/seed-grant-planted-in-rural-healthcare-facility" title="Learn about this Seed Grant project" target="_blank">Connecting with Community</a>: Wisconsin Idea Seed grant ​connects university's autism experts and graduate students with rural healthcare facility<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/black-arts-matter-festival" title="Read about the Black Arts Matter Festival" target="_blank">Connecting with Community</a>: Undergraduate Shasparay Lighteard launches arts festival to celebrate black artists and build community<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/news-and-notes" title="Check out the latest news and notes" target="_blank">News and Notes</a>: Check out a range of highlights from across the School during this past academic year<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/media-mentions" title="Check out a sampling of media mentions" target="_blank">Media Mentions</a>: ​Learn about ​some of the media outlets putting the spotlight on, and utilizing the expertise of, faculty, staff and alumni associated with the School<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/wei-lab" title="Learn about this Wei LAB project" target="_blank">Innovation</a>: Wei LAB, led by Jerlando Jackson, is partnering with Nehemiah to examine ways to reduce health disparities in African-American communities<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/sstar-lab" title="Learn about the SSTAR Lab" target="_blank">Innovation</a>: Student outcomes data crunchers brought into UW&ndash;Madison's financial aid office with launch of Associate Professor Nicholas Hillman's SSTAR Lab<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/mansfield-hall" title="Read about Mansfield Hall" target="_blank">Spotlight</a>: UW&ndash;Madison alums Perry and Sean LaRoque launch Mansfield Hall, a living and learning community that helps students with diverse needs realize their goals<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/buff-brennan" title="Read about Buff Brennan's commitment to Dance" target="_blank">Spotlight:</a> Learn how Buff Brennan has spent her career encouraging and supporting dance students<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/aera-2019" title="Check out highlights from AERA 2019" target="_blank">Badgers shine at #AERA19</a><br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/alumni-breakouts" title="Learn about these alumni" target="_blank">Alumni breakouts</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/class-notes" title="Read about updates our alumni sent in" target="_blank">Class notes</a>: Check out what your fellow School of Education alumni are up to</p>urn:uuid:0670c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/06/24/school-of-education-graduate-students-receive-global-health-institute-awards School of Education graduate students receive Global Health Institute awardsThis year, three graduate students with ties to the School of Education have received Global Health Institute awards and grants. Niu Yanzhuo and Rui Meng of the Department of Educational Psychology, and Ngonidzashe Mpofu of the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education, all earned Gradate Student Research Awards.Mon, 24 Jun 2019 10:30:00 Z<p>This year, three graduate students with ties to the UW&ndash;Madison School of Education have received Global Health Institute awards and grants.</p> <p>Niu Yanzhuo, a graduate student with the <a href="https://edpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Ed Psych home page" target="_blank">Department of Educational Psychology</a>, received a Graduate Student Research Award for her project, &ldquo;Magic Mirror, Magic Mirror, Am I Attractive: The Effect of Auto-Beauty Filters on College Female Students&rsquo; Self-Evaluation.&rdquo; Yanzhuo will focus on how exposure to enhanced image of self would influence one&rsquo;s evaluation of self, based on research linking selfie-editing to behaviors with body dissatisfaction.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Interpretation of Covariation Data: The Influence of Symmetry of Variables,&rdquo; a project from Rui Meng, a graduate student with Department of Educational Psychology, received a Graduate Student Research Award. Meng&rsquo;s research explores the difficulty interpreting covariation data, which constrains medical decision making.&nbsp;</p> <p>Ngonidzashe Mpofu, a graduate student with the&nbsp;<a href="https://rpse.education.wisc.edu/" title="RPSE home page" target="_blank">Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education</a>, has also received a Graduate Student Research Award. Mpofu&rsquo;s&nbsp;&nbsp;project is titled &ldquo;A Pilot Study: Closing the Rehabilitation Service Utilization Gaps of New Zealand&rsquo;s (Aotearora) Maori People.&rdquo; Mpfou&rsquo;s research project addresses the lack of research regarding cultural- and needs-informed strategies that rehabilitation service providers can use to close the service utilization gap for the Maori that currently exists.&nbsp;</p> Read the news release <a href="https://ghi.wisc.edu/from-mosquitoes-to-antibiotic-resistance-global-health-2019-grants-advance-projects-across-the-world/" title="GHI awards and grants news release" target="_blank">here</a>.&nbsp;urn:uuid:e369c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/06/17/school-of-education-grand-challenges-seed-grants School of Education Grand Challenges: Seed Grants announcedThe School of Education’s Grand Challenges initiative, which aims to ignite cross-disciplinary innovation, spent much of the 2018-19 academic year focusing on a new Seed Grants Competition. In late May, nine interdisciplinary teams were awarded $75,000 each to grow their ambitious ideasMon, 17 Jun 2019 10:30:00 Z<p>The School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://grandchallenges.education.wisc.edu/" title="Grand Challenges info page" target="_blank">Grand Challenges</a> initiative, which aims to ignite cross-disciplinary innovation, spent much of the 2018-19 academic year focusing on a new Seed Grants competition.</p> <p>In late May, nine interdisciplinary teams were awarded $75,000 each to grow their ambitious ideas. This project launched with a request for proposals in November 2018, with three separate competitions &mdash; one in the arts, one in health, and one in education.&nbsp;</p> <p>For much of the spring semester, the Grand Challenges team worked with scholars to pull together interdisciplinary, creative, and impactful Seed Grant proposals that can address critical issues across the arts, health, and education.</p> <h3>Winning Seed Grant initiatives in Education</h3> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/tikuyendadi.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Tikuyendadi" title="Tikuyendadi" class="FloatImageRight" /><br /> Project name: </strong>Tikuyendadi: Supporting Expansive Education for Children with Disabilities in Malawi<strong><br /> <br /> People involved: &nbsp;</strong>Nancy Kendall <strong>(<a href="https://eps.education.wisc.edu/" title="Educational Policy Studies home page" target="_blank">EPS</a>),</strong> Aydin Ball (<a href="https://rpse.education.wisc.edu/" title="Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education Department" target="_blank">RPSE</a>), Lori DiPrete Brown (<a href="https://sohe.wisc.edu/" title="School of Human Ecology website" target="_blank">SoHE</a>), Augustine Kanyendula (USAID &ndash; Reading for all Malawi), Zikani Kaunda (Institute for Participatory Engagement and Quality Improvement), and Chrissie Thakwalakwa (University of Malawi).<br /> <br /> <strong>Overview:</strong> This project addresses concerns about educational access and quality for children with disabilities, especially in low-income countries. The goal of Tikuyendadi (&ldquo;Let&rsquo;s go Together&rdquo; in Chichewa, Malawi&rsquo;s national language) is to learn from, and contribute to, government, school, family, community, and disability rights movement efforts in Malawi to support students with disabilities and provide an equal, inclusive, and transformative education for all.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/urban-indigenous-arts.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Urban Indigenous Arts" title="Urban Indigenous Arts" class="FloatImageLeft" />Project name: </strong>Urban Indigenous Arts and Sciences: Creating Educator Professional Development in an Intertribal Context<br /> <br /> <strong>People involved:</strong>&nbsp; Bruce King (<a href="https://elpa.education.wisc.edu/" title="Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis home page" target="_blank">ELPA</a>)<strong>,</strong> Laura Lang (ELPA), Sarah Krauskopf (graduate student, <a href="https://ci.education.wisc.edu/" title="Curriculum and Instruction home page" target="_blank">Curriculum and Instruction</a>), Nicky Bowman&nbsp;(<a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/" title="Wisconsin Center for Education Research website" target="_blank">WCER</a>), Cheryl Bauer-Armstrong, Rachel Byington, Claire Bjork, and Maria Moreno (Earth Partnership). <br /> <br /> <strong>Overview:</strong> Wisconsin Act 31 requires the teaching of the history, culture, and sovereignty of Wisconsin Native Nations in K-12 public schools. However, teachers currently lack the capacity to teach about Wisconsin Native Nations in urban, intertribal settings where direct connections with tribal lands, staff, and elders are limited, and numerous tribes are represented in one locality. By combining an established curriculum, with an innovative framework for effective educator professional development, this project provides a critical tool to build teacher capacity.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/ourhmoob.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="OurHMoob" title="OurHMoob" class="FloatImageRight" />Project name: </strong>Our HMoob American College Paj Ntaub<br /> <strong>&nbsp;<br /> People involved: </strong>Stacey Lee (EPS)<strong>,&nbsp;</strong>Bailey Smolarek and Matthew Wolfgram (WCER),&nbsp;and HMoob American Studies Committee Student Researchers, Freedom Inc.<br /> <br /> <strong>Overview: </strong>&nbsp;In collaboration with UW-Madison student members of the HMoob American Studies Committee, the proposed community-based participatory action research project will examine the sociocultural, demographic, and institutional factors that influence the college experiences, educational successes, and post-college transitions of HMoob American students (commonly spelled &ldquo;Hmong Americans&rdquo;)&nbsp;at UW-Madison. This research draws on the lived experiences of HMoob American college students to examine the themes of trauma, resilience, displacement, and diaspora.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> </p> <h3>Winning Seed Grant initiatives in Health</h3> <p><strong><br /> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/braininflammation.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="BrainInflammation" title="BrainInflammation" class="FloatImageLeft" />Project name: </strong>Brain Inflammation in Chronic Multi-Symptom Disease<br /> <strong>&nbsp;<br /> People involved: </strong>Dane Cook<strong> (<a href="https://kinesiology.education.wisc.edu/" title="Kinesiology home page" target="_blank">Kinesiology</a>),&nbsp;</strong>Bradley Christian (<a href="https://www.medphysics.wisc.edu/wp/" title="Medical Physics website" target="_blank">Medical Physics</a>).<br /> <br /> <strong>Overview:</strong> The search for the underlying causes of chronic multi-symptom illnesses (CMIs) is a Grand Challenge in the health fields. With a specific focus of Gulf War Illness, this project uses state-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques combined with exercise-induced stress to document the role of neural inflammation in the maintenance and exacerbation of this debilitating illness.</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/balancerehabilitation.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="BalanceRehabilitation" title="BalanceRehabilitation" class="FloatImageRight" />Project name: </strong>Balance Rehabilitation via Robotic training of Foot-Force<br /> <strong>&nbsp;<br /> People involved: </strong>Kreg Gruben (Kinesiology),<strong>&nbsp;</strong>Peter Adamczyk (<a href="https://www.engr.wisc.edu/department/biomedical-engineering/" title="Biomedical Engineering home page" target="_blank">Medical Engineering</a>), Jennifer Bartloff (Kinesiology).<br /> <br /> <strong>Overview:</strong> The Grand Challenge addressed by this project is restoring mobility for stroke-affected individuals. Utilizing two complementary robotic rehabilitation devices, the Nottabike and the KIINCE, researchers will aim to correct the root cause of balance disruption following neurological impairment. The proposed project takes a unique approach to understanding human mobility by focusing on the fundamental structure of intact balance control and the underlying deficits caused by neurological impairment.</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/association-between.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Association Between" title="Association Between" class="FloatImageLeft" />Project name: </strong>The Association Between Poverty, Executive Function, and Early Brain Development<strong> <br /> <br /> People involved: </strong>Sarah Short<strong> (<a href="https://edpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Education Psychology home page" target="_blank">Ed Psych</a>)</strong>, Rasmus Birn (Medical Physics), Cathi Propper and Roger Mills-Koonce (UNC-Chapel Hill), Michael Willoughby (Research Triangle International).<br /> <br /> <strong>Overview:</strong> Poor cognitive and academic outcomes are well-known consequences for children growing up in poverty. The proposed study is designed to comprehensively assess prenatal and postnatal factors that mediate the association between poverty and brain development. This project will use neuroimaging data to provide valuable insights about when and how the brain is impacted in early development and uncover potential windows of opportunity for targeted interventions that could reduce the income-achievement gap.</p> <h3>Winning Seed Grant initiatives in the Arts</h3> <p><strong><br /> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/art-integration.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Art-Integration" title="Art-Integration" class="FloatImageRight" />Project name: </strong>Arts-integration for Social Emotional Learning<br /> <strong>&nbsp;<br /> People involved: </strong>Kate Corby<strong> (<a href="https://dance.wisc.edu/" title="Dance Department home page" target="_blank">Dance</a>),&nbsp;</strong>Mariah LeFeber and Mary Patterson (<a href="https://www.dance.wisc.edu/dance/.../performing-ourselves-showcase" title="Performing Ourselves Info page" target="_blank">Performing Ourselves</a>), Yorel Lashley (<a href="https://place.education.wisc.edu/" title="Professional Learning and Community Education website" target="_blank">PLACE</a>), Padraic Cassidy (Wadoma). Melinda Trudell (MMSD).<br /> <br /> <strong>Overview:</strong> Arts-integration for Social Emotional Learning (SEL) synthesizes the arts of drum and dance to provide social-emotional learning opportunities or students and professional development for teachers. The project is a collaboration between Drum Power and Performing Ourselves, two programs of the UW Community Arts Collaboratory, and Lowell Elementary School. Through surveys and qualitative interviews, the research team will document the effects of SEL on student development, staff professional development, and outcomes assessment.</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/these-grand-places.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="These Grand Places" title="These Grand Places" class="FloatImageLeft" />Project name: </strong>These Grand Places<br /> <strong>&nbsp;<br /> People involved: </strong>Tomiko Jones<strong> (<a href="https://art.wisc.edu/" title="Art Department home page" target="_blank">Art</a>),&nbsp;</strong>Omar Poler (SoE), Giri Venkataramanan (<a href="https://www.engr.wisc.edu/.../electrical-computer-engineering/" title="Electrical &amp; Computer Engineering home page" target="_blank">Electrical &amp; Computer Engineering</a>), Adena Rissman (<a href="https://forestandwildlifeecology.wisc.edu/" title="Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology website" target="_blank">Forest &amp; Wildlife Ecology</a>), Emily Arthur (Art), Targol Mesbah (California Institute of Integral Studies), Pireeni Sundaralingam (San Francisco Exploratorium), Lisa Ruth Elliot (Shaping San Francisco).<br /> <br /> <strong>Overview:</strong>&nbsp;These Grand Places<em>&nbsp;</em>is a socially engaged photography-based artistic research project that consists of fabricating a mobile research studio and realizing creative field research on public land. Utilizing on-site residencies to gather information, stories, and visual artifacts,&nbsp;These Grand Places&nbsp;documents the lived experience and connections between land and people. Outcomes include an exhibition and publication to be shared with collaborators and the public through conventional art contexts, educational institutions, civic spaces, and online.</p> <p><strong><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/modeling-movement.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Modeling Movement" title="Modeling Movement" class="FloatImageRight" />Project name: </strong>Modeling movement-Based Pedagogy for Parkinson Disease into Multiple Craft Disciplines<br /> <strong>&nbsp;<br /> People involved: </strong>Helen Lee (Art)<strong>,&nbsp;</strong>Kristen Pickett (Kinesiology), Sharon Gartland (<a href="https://kinesiology.education.wisc.edu/ot/about/" title="Occupational Therapy info page" target="_blank">Occupational Therapy</a>), Brian Kluge (Midwest Clay Project), Sylvie Rosenthal (Independent artist), Marianne Fairbanks (Design Studies).<br /> <br /> <strong>Overview:</strong> This work addresses the Grand Challenge of diversifying the range of therapeutic modalities available to individual with Parkinson Disease. Previous research in glassblowing established pedagogical insight about the psychological, social, and emotional effects of purposeful arts-based interventions. The proposed work extends this inquiry into ceramics, metals, wood, and fibers. Through building dedicated community-based partnerships, this work stands to open innovative professional pathways for craftspeople and future clinicians.</p>urn:uuid:d369c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/06/12/uw-madison-team-joins-leaders-from-across-u.s.-in-addressing-shortage-of-special-education-teachers UW-Madison team joins leaders from across U.S. in addressing shortage of special education teachersFaculty members from UW-Madison are part of a new group of higher education leaders being brought together to examine ways to help school districts address the critical problem of recruiting and retaining special education teachers. These efforts are being led by the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE), which is bringing together experts from 10 colleges and universities.Wed, 12 Jun 2019 11:00:00 Z<p>Faculty members from UW-Madison are part of a new group of higher education leaders being brought together to examine ways to help school districts address the critical problem of recruiting and retaining special education teachers.</p> <p>These efforts are being led by the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE), which is bringing together experts from 10 colleges and universities.</p> <p>&ldquo;Half of all schools and 90 percent of high-poverty schools struggle to find qualified special education teachers,&rdquo; Jacqueline Rodriguez, AACTE&rsquo;s assistant vice president who leads the new program, said in this news release. &ldquo;Special education teacher shortages often have a disproportionate effect on English learners and African Americans who are overrepresented in special education. This initiative is critical for helping to improve access to learning for students with disabilities from all backgrounds and to better equip special education teachers to become more effective in the classroom.&rdquo;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/education-building.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Education Building" displaymode="Original" title="Education Building" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Faculty members from UW&ndash;Madison's School of Education<br /> are part of a new group of higher education leaders being<br /> brought together to examine ways to help school districts<br /> address the critical problem of recruiting and retaining<br /> special education teachers.</figcaption> </figure> </div> The AACTE project is called Reducing the Shortage of Special Education Teachers Networked Improvement Community (NIC).&nbsp;</p> <p>Andrea Ruppar, an associate professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://rpse.education.wisc.edu/" title="RPSE home page" target="_blank">Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education</a>, led efforts to secure UW-Madison&rsquo;s involvement with this project.</p> <p>&ldquo;Our department is involved with several initiatives to increase the number and diversity of special educators in the state,&rdquo; says Ruppar. &ldquo;While we already know quite a bit about the problem of special education teacher shortages, there is limited information available about effective solutions. Participating in the Networked Improvement Community will allow us to learn from and collaborate with&nbsp;other states and institutions. Together, we can identify and evaluate ways to make a meaningful impact on increasing the special education teacher workforce in Wisconsin and across the country.&rdquo;</p> <p>Participating institutions were selected based on several criteria, including each university&rsquo;s commitment to increasing its recruitment into special education degree programs and for recruiting diverse candidates into these programs. The NIC members focus on ways to strengthen partnerships between colleges of education and P-12 schools to address special education teacher turnover, and to create new programs in partnership with P-12 schools to prepare and retain diverse special educators for specific vacancies.&nbsp;</p> <p>In Wisconsin, Ruppar notes that special education has been identified as an area where there is a particular dearth of qualified teachers. She explains that over the last decade, the supply of certified special educators in Wisconsin has been far below school district demands &ndash; and the situation is getting worse.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/andrea_ruppar.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Andrea Ruppar" displaymode="Original" title="Andrea_Ruppar" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Ruppar </figcaption> </figure> </div> Ruppar explains how she and her colleagues within the School of Education &mdash;including Kimber Wilkerson and Melinda Leko &mdash; are working hard to address the special education teacher shortage in Wisconsin. Wilkerson is a professor and the faculty director of the School&rsquo;s Teacher Education Center. Leko is an associate professor who chairs the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education.</p> <p>Ruppar highlights several current efforts in the School of Education to address the shortage of special educators, including programs with the Madison Metropolitan School District to identify paraprofessionals and other staff, as well as emergency-certified teachers, to work with them to become fully certified special educators. Another new initiative, funded by a Teacher Quality Partnership grant, gives the School of Education the opportunity to partner with seven rural school districts, as well as the urban School District of Beloit, to provide coursework and a year-long residency for special education teacher candidates.&nbsp;</p> <p>Similarly, a research grant from the Spencer Foundation is allowing Ruppar and her colleagues to gather information about the experiences and needs of rural special education teachers.</p> <p>In addition to UW-Madison, the nine other colleges/schools of education AACTE invited to participate in its new NIC are: Cleveland State University; Eastern Michigan University; Texas State University; University of Central Florida; University of Nebraska at Omaha; University of Northern Colorado; University of Oregon; Virginia State University; and Western Kentucky University.&nbsp;</p> <p>AACTE is partnering with the Collaboration for Effective Educator Development, Accountability, and Reform (CEEDAR) Center to implement its Special Education NIC.</p>urn:uuid:6c5ec237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/05/11/school-of-education-honors-spring-2019-graduates School of Education honors Spring 2019 graduatesUW-Madison's School of Education put a spotlight on its newest class of graduates by hosting two major events at the Gordon Dining and Event Center. On Friday evening, May 10, the School honored its Spring 2019 Ph.D. and master of fine arts degree recipients during a traditional hooding ceremony. And on Saturday morning, May 11, the School celebrated with its latest class of bachelor’s and master’s degree recipients during the annual Pre-Commencement Celebration. Congratulations and best of luck to all of our graduates! And remember: You may no longer be a student, but you’ll always be a Badger!Sat, 11 May 2019 16:01:00 Z<p>UW-Madison's School of Education put a spotlight on its newest class of graduates by hosting two major events at the Gordon Dining and Event Center.</p> <p><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/commencement-2019.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Pre-Commencement Celebration" title="Commencement 2019" class="FloatImageRight" />On Friday evening, May 10, the School honored its Spring 2019 Ph.D. and master of fine arts degree recipients during a traditional hooding ceremony. Bucky Badger stopped in to salute our new alums and check out the scene before Dean Diana Hess welcomed and congratulated this newest cohort of #UWGrads. </p> <p>And on Saturday morning, May 11, the School celebrated with its latest class of bachelor&rsquo;s and master&rsquo;s degree recipients during the annual Pre-Commencement Celebration. Before everyone headed over to Camp Randall Stadium for UW-Madison&rsquo;s Spring 2019 Commencement Ceremony, students enjoyed breakfast with faculty and staff, family and friends, hung out with Bucky Badger, and heard from Hess.</p> <p>Congratulations and best of luck to all of our graduates!</p> <p>And remember: You may no longer be a student, but you&rsquo;ll always be a Badger!</p> Make sure and check out photo galleries of the big day that are posted to the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/UWMadisonEducation" target="_blank" title="Visit the School's Facebook Page">School of Education&rsquo;s Facebook Page</a>.<br /> <br /> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/pre-commencement-celebration-2.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Pre-Commencement celebration" title="Pre-Commencement Celebration 2" class="FloatImageLeft" />urn:uuid:e359c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/05/07/uw-madison-s-ko--hong-receive-kaera-graduate-student-research-paper-award UW-Madison’s Ko, Hong receive KAERA Graduate Student Research Paper AwardUW-Madison’s Dosun Ko and Joan Hong received the 2019 Korean-American Educational Research Association (KAERA) Graduate Student Research Paper Award. They are being recognized for their paper, “Social production of space and everday microagressions: A case study of (im)migrant youth in South Korea.” Tue, 07 May 2019 10:22:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Dosun Ko and Joan Hong received the 2019 Korean-American Educational Research Association (KAERA) Graduate Student Research Paper Award.</p> <p>Ko is a Ph.D. student with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://rpse.education.wisc.edu/" title="RPSE home page" target="_blank">Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education</a>, and Hong is a Ph.D. student with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="http://eps.education.wisc.edu" title="EPS home page" target="_blank">Department of Educational Policy Studies</a>.</p> <p>The KAERA is an organization of Korean-American and Korean educational researchers dedicated to the advancement of knowledge, scholarship, and practice in education.</p> <p>They are being recognized for their paper, &ldquo;Social production of space and everday microagressions: A case study of (im)migrant youth in South Korea.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Utilizing the Koryoin community from post-soviet states living in South Korea as a critical case, thise study explores how cultural, linguistic, legal, and economic bordering practices in space result in dehumanizing effects such as microaggressions inflicted towards (im)migrant students and entail academic and psychological harms, pushing Koryoin students out from the space of learning opportunity.</p> <p>Ko and Hong were recognized during the 2019 KAERA Conference on April 5.</p>urn:uuid:374fc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/04/15/charleston-named-school-of-education-s-associate-dean-for-diversity-and-inclusion Charleston named School of Education’s associate dean for diversity and inclusionLaVar Charleston was recently named the School of Education’s first associate dean for diversity and inclusion, a position he is starting on June 16. In this role, Charleston will serve on the dean’s leadership team and will lead the creation of a new School of Education Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Charleston, an alumnus of UW–Madison’s School of Education, has served since the summer of 2017 as UW–Whitewater’s assistant vice chancellor of student diversity, engagement, and success.Mon, 15 Apr 2019 10:30:00 Z<p>LaVar Charleston was recently named the School of Education&rsquo;s first associate dean for diversity and inclusion, a position he is starting on June 16.</p> <p>In this role, Charleston will serve on the dean&rsquo;s leadership team and will lead the creation of a new School of Education Office of Diversity and Inclusion.</p> <p>&ldquo;We are thrilled that Dr. Charleston is joining the School of Education as the inaugural associate dean for diversity and inclusion,&rdquo; says School of Education Dean Diana Hess, who holds the Karen A. Falk Distinguished Chair of Education. &ldquo;He is a dynamic and thoughtful leader with just the right mix of extensive experience and exceptional skills to lead the development of the new office of Diversity and Inclusion."</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/lavar-charleston-250-px-sq-head-shot.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="LaVar Charleston" displaymode="Original" title="LaVar Charleston 250 px SQ head shot" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Charleston </figcaption> </figure> </div> Charleston, an alumnus of UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s School of Education, has served since the summer of 2017 as UW&ndash;Whitewater&rsquo;s assistant vice chancellor of student diversity, engagement, and success.</p> <p>In his new position, Charleston will be providing leadership to faculty, staff, and students in developing and implementing strategic initiatives that promote the School of Education and UW-Madison's mission for diversity, equity, and inclusion. Similarly, he will lead efforts to implement and review diversity-related policies and procedures that support School of Education programming and planning to foster a diverse and inclusive community.</p> <p>&ldquo;It is an honor to return to the School of Education that has poured so much into me when I was an early career scholar engaged in critical concepts of equity, diversity, and inclusion within higher education,&rdquo; says Charleston. &ldquo;I appreciate the vision of Dean Hess to incorporate Inclusive Excellence into the fabric of all of our programs, policies, and practices. As my entire career within higher education has been dedicated to creating equitable and inclusive working and learning environments, I look forward to instituting what I&rsquo;ve learned throughout the years to contribute to the inclusive dynamism of the School of Education&rsquo;s students, staff, faculty, and overall community.&rdquo;</p> <p>Prior to his work at UW&ndash;Whitewater, Charleston from 2012 to 2017 was part of the team that helped launch Wisconsin&rsquo;s Equity and Inclusion Laboratory (Wei LAB), which promotes equitable environments for learning and working in higher education. The Wei LAB is housed in the School of Education&rsquo;s Wisconsin Center for Education Research. At the time he was hired by UW&ndash;Whitewater, Charleston was serving as assistant director and a senior research associate of the Wei Lab, and serving as the coordinator for the lab&rsquo;s research and evaluation division.</p> <p>Charleston, who lettered in football as an undergraduate at Ball State University, also helped to develop Beyond the Game, a curriculum that helps student-athletes plan for careers outside professional sports. The program, which has been used at UW&ndash;Madison, was designed to help African American, male college athletes more strongly identify with the academic side of their student experience.</p> <p>Charleston received both his master&rsquo;s degree (2007) and Ph.D. (2010) from the School of Education&rsquo;s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. He also taught courses on leadership and intersecting identities for that department.</p> <p>Charleston is an expert in the kinds of support students need to stay enrolled and succeed in college and in how to help them prepare for graduate school. He has also studied how to motivate more students from underrepresented groups toward career paths in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.</p> <p>In February, the Wisconsin Alumni Association presented Charleston with a 2019 Forward Under 40 Award, which honors UW&ndash;Madison alumni under the age of 40 who are living the Wisconsin Idea, leveraging the benefits of their education to better their cities, states, nation, and even the world. Charleston was recognized for making waves of change, with colleges and universities at home and abroad looking to him for his voice and award-winning scholarship exploring how more students can access higher education.</p>urn:uuid:cd4bc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/04/09/uw-madison-alumni--faculty--and-students-sweep-arca-s-top-research-awards UW-Madison alumni, faculty, and students sweep ARCA's top Research AwardsThe American Rehabilitation Counseling Association (ARCA) recently announced its annual Research Awards, and teams associated with UW-Madison authored papers receiving first-, second-, and third-place recognition. This marks the fifth straight year in which researchers associated with UW–Madison have earned top honors in the ARCA Research Awards competition — with an RPSE alumnus being the lead author each time.Tue, 09 Apr 2019 13:22:31 Z<p>The American Rehabilitation Counseling Association (ARCA) recently announced its annual Research Awards, and teams associated with UW-Madison authored papers receiving first-, second-, and third-place recognition.</p> <p>ARCA is the flagship professional organization for rehabilitation counselors, with the ARCA Research Awards recognizing and honoring high-quality, empirical research in the field.</p> <p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s rehabilitation counseling program is housed within the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://rpse.education.wisc.edu/" title="RSPE home page" target="_blank">Department of Rehabilitation Counseling and Special Education (RPSE)</a>. This UW-Madison program was rated No. 1 in the nation in March according to U.S. News and World Report&rsquo;s 2020 Best Graduate Schools Rankings.</p> <p>This marks the fifth straight year in which researchers associated with UW&ndash;Madison have earned top honors in the ARCA Research Awards competition &mdash; with an RPSE alumnus being the lead author each time. Of the first place winners over the past 40 years of these awards, UW-Madison faculty or alumni have been lead authors on 20 of these top papers.</p> <p>&bull; The first-place award this year is for a paper appearing in the Rehabilitation&nbsp;Counseling Bulletin titled, &ldquo;Flourishing in student veterans with and without service-connected disability: psychometric validation of the Flourishing Scale and exploration of its relationships with personality and disability.&rdquo; (Read the paper <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0034355218808061" title="'Flourishing in Student Veterans' paper" target="_blank">here</a>.)&nbsp;</p> <p>The lead author on this report is University of Texas, El Paso faculty member Emre Umucu, who received a Ph.D. from UW-Madison&rsquo;s Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education in 2017. Co-authors on the paper with ties to UW&ndash;Madison are: RPSE doctoral students Teresa Ann Grenawalt, Antonio Reyes and Beatrice Lee; Associate Professor Tim Tansey; North Texas University faculty member and UW-Madison alumnus Jessica Brooks; Carey Gleason with the Veterans Hospital in Madison; and Professor Emeritus Fong Chan.&nbsp;</p> <p>The abstract for this paper explains: &ldquo;Veterans are an increasing population in postsecondary education. Many student veterans have disabilities affecting their well-being and success in college. This study aims to add to current knowledge on well-being by exploring the relationship between flourishing, personality traits, and service-connected disability among student veterans. &hellip; Findings indicate the Flourishing Scale (FS) is a reliable and valid scale that could be used to measure flourishing in student veterans. Detailed findings and their implications for rehabilitation counseling are provided.&rdquo;</p> <p>&bull; The second-place ARCA Research Award went to the study, &ldquo;Assessing college life adjustment of students with disabilities: Application of the PERMA Framework,&rdquo;&nbsp;which appears in the Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin. (Read the study <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0034355217702136" title="'Assessing college life adjustment of students with disabilities' paper" target="_blank">here</a>.)</p> <p>Tansey is the lead author on this report, with co-authors including: RPSE Associate Professor Susan Miller Smedema; Umucu; Northern Illinois University faculty member and UW-Madison alumnus Kanako Iwanaga; RPSE doctoral student Jia-Rung Wu; Hunter College faculty member and RPSE alum Elizabeth da Silva Cardoso; and University of Illinois faculty member and RPSE alum David Strauser.</p> <p>This paper&rsquo;s abstract explains that the &ldquo;clearest career path to the middle class generally involves access, and completion, of postsecondary education. However, persons with disabilities are less likely to enroll or graduate from college compared with their same-age peers without disabilities. The quality of life of students with disabilities, and their well-being, may be a root cause of low graduation rates. To flourish in life is to both feel good and function effectively. Seligman developed the Positive Emotion, Engagement, Relationships, Meaning, and Accomplishment (PERMA) model that may be useful in understanding the well-being of individuals. The purpose of this study is to examine the factorial structure of the PERMA model in sample college students with disabilities and then examine the model&rsquo;s relationship with outcomes important to college adjustment, such as academic achievement, relationship problems, stress, life satisfaction, and core self-evaluation.&rdquo;</p> <p>The abstract continues: &ldquo;Ninety-seven college students with disabilities enrolled in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) were recruited for the study. Findings support a one-factor solution for the PERMA measurement model. Furthermore, PERMA was negatively correlated with factors associated with college difficulty and positively associated with factors linked to college success. The PERMA model also demonstrated that well-being mediates the relationship between functional disability and life satisfaction. Implications for rehabilitation researchers and practitioners are reviewed.&rdquo;</p> <p>&bull; The third-place ARCA Research Award was for a study appearing in The Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin titled, &ldquo;A Needs Driven Model of Workplace Social&nbsp;Effectiveness in Adults With Disabilities.&rdquo; (Read the study <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0034355217747690" title="'A Needs Driven Model...Adults With Disabilities' study" target="_blank">here</a>.)&nbsp;</p> <p>The lead author on this paper is UW-Madison&rsquo;s Brian Phillips, an associate professor with the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education. Co-authors include: RPSE doctoral students Reyes, Alexandra Kriofske Mainella and Rachel Kesselmayer; and RPSE master&rsquo;s degree alumnus Joseph Jacobson.&nbsp;</p> <p>This paper&rsquo;s abstract reports: &ldquo;Social effectiveness is central to workplace success. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the factors that influence effectiveness in managing the social requirements of the workplace. This study provides a preliminary analysis of a model of workplace social effectiveness for adults with disabilities. &hellip; Results from a structural equation model analysis suggest that both a communal and positive social approach predict workplace social effectiveness. The ability to connect with others partially mediated relationships between both communal and positive approaches and workplace social effectiveness. Although the cross-sectional and self-report nature of this study limits the conclusions that can be drawn, the findings lay a groundwork for further model testing and clinical interventions in rehabilitation counseling services.&rdquo;</p>urn:uuid:ab48c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/04/01/uw-madison-s-bal-to-receive-aera-s-scholars-of-color-early-career-contribution-award UW–Madison’s Bal to receive AERA’s Scholars of Color Early Career Contribution AwardThe American Educational Research Association (AERA) announced the winners of its 2019 awards for excellence in education research on March 29 and UW–Madison’s Aydin Bal is receiving the Scholars of Color Early Career Contribution Award. Bal’s current research projects aim at developing culturally responsive research methodologies and intervention models. In particular, he has developed the Culturally Responsive Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (CRPBIS) framework and Learning Lab methodology, an equity-oriented systemic transformation model that he is helping implement in schools internationally.Mon, 01 Apr 2019 15:50:51 Z<p>The American Educational Research Association (AERA) announced the winners of its 2019 awards for excellence in education research on March 29 and UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s Aydin Bal is receiving the Scholars of Color Early Career Contribution Award.</p> <p>Bal is an associate professor of special education with the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/aydin-bal-presentation-1.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Aydin Bal" displaymode="Original" title="Aydin Bal presentation 1" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Aydin Bal has developed the Culturally<br /> Responsive Positive Behavioral<br /> Interventions and Supports (CRPBIS)<br /> framework and Learning Lab<br /> methodology.</figcaption> </figure> </div> His research focuses on the interplay between culture, learning, and behavioral problems through the study of sociohistorical and spatial constructions of deviance across local and global education systems. Bal&rsquo;s current research projects aim at developing culturally responsive research methodologies and intervention models. In particular, he has developed the Culturally Responsive Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (CRPBIS) framework and Learning Lab methodology, an equity-oriented systemic transformation model that he is helping implement in schools internationally.</p> <p>AERA will honor all of its awards for excellence in education research recipients at the Awards Ceremony and Celebration, April 7, at the AERA Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada.</p> <p>&ldquo;This year&rsquo;s award winners exemplify commitment to the study and practice of education,&rdquo; said AERA Executive Director Felice J. Levine. &ldquo;We are proud to honor their outstanding scholarship and service to the field.&rdquo;</p> <p>The Committee on Scholars of Color in Education Awards are intended to recognize scholars at different stages in their careers who have made significant contributions to the understanding of issues that disproportionately affect minority populations. These also honor minority scholars who have made a significant contribution to education research and development.</p> <p>The Scholars of Color Early Career Contribution Award is presented to a scholar who is within the first decade of his or her career after receipt of a doctoral degree.</p> <p>In addition to Bal, UW-Madison alumna Patricia Edwards is receiving the Scholars of Color Distinguished Career Contribution Award. Edwards, of Michigan State University, earned her Ph.D. from the School of Education&rsquo;s Department of Curriculum and Instruction in 1979.</p> <p>The American Educational Research Association (AERA) is the largest national interdisciplinary research association devoted to the scientific study of education and learning. Founded in 1916, AERA advances knowledge about education, encourages scholarly inquiry related to education, and promotes the use of research to improve education and serve the public good.</p>urn:uuid:1f44c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/03/29/mpofu-receiving-graduate-student-research-award-from-uw-madison-global-health-institute Mpofu receiving Graduate Student Research Award from UW-Madison Global Health InstituteThe UW-Madison Global Health Institute recently informed School of Education Ph.D. student Ngonidzashe Mpofu that she is receiving a Graduate Student Research Award to fund her proposal, “Closing the Rehabilitation Service Utilization Gaps of New Zealand’s (Aotearoa) Māori People.” Mpofu will use the funding for a pilot study this summer in Auckland, New Zealand, where she will be completing pre-dissertation research focusing on the problem of Māori adults having the highest rates of depression and suicide — but also having the lowest rates of mental health treatment by mental health providers.Fri, 29 Mar 2019 09:47:00 Z<p>The UW-Madison <a href="https://ghi.wisc.edu/" title="GHI website" target="_blank">Global Health Institute</a> recently informed School of Education Ph.D. student Ngonidzashe Mpofu that she is receiving a Graduate Student Research Award to fund her proposal, &ldquo;Closing the Rehabilitation Service Utilization Gaps of New Zealand&rsquo;s (Aotearoa) Māori People.&rdquo;</p> <p>Mpofu is a doctoral student in rehabilitation counselor education with the&nbsp;<a href="https://rpse.education.wisc.edu/" title="RPSE home page" target="_blank">Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education</a>.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/ngonidzashe-mpofu.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Mpofu" displaymode="Original" title="Ngonidzashe Mpofu" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Mpofu </figcaption> </figure> </div> Mpofu will use the funding for a pilot study this summer in Auckland, New Zealand, where she will be completing pre-dissertation research focusing on the problem of&nbsp;&nbsp;Māori adults having the highest rates of depression and suicide &mdash; but also having the lowest rates of mental health treatment by mental health providers.&nbsp;&nbsp;She notes that this work will also look at the secondary impacts of untreated mental health issues in Māori society, including disability formation and substance use.</p> <p>She also explains that this pilot study seeks to understand the barriers to Māori seeking help, including but not limited to self-stigma or help-seeking, culturally relevant psychoeducation and treatment services, and other barriers that limit utilization of mental health care services.</p> <p>Mpofu says the aims of her project are to: identify Māori social identity, disability formation, and perceptions of rehabilitation service; and to develop an outreach program based on the research findings that are capable of addressing existing gaps in service utilization and service provision using the Knowledge-To-Action (KTA) knowledge translation model.</p>urn:uuid:dc3ac237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/03/12/uw-madison-ties-for-no--1-ranking-among-public-schools-of-education UW–Madison ties for No. 1 ranking among public schools of educationU.S. News and World Report released its 2020 Best Education Graduate Schools rankings on March 12, and UW-Madison is home to the highest-rated public school of education in the nation, a distinction it is sharing this year with the University of California-Los Angeles. UW–Madison’s School of Education is No. 3 overall, trailing only Ivy League privates Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania. UW–Madison, UCLA, and Stanford University all tied for the No. 3 spot. In addition, UW–Madison’s School of Education is also home to nine specialty programs ranked among the top 10 in the nation — including the top-ranked program in rehabilitation counseling.Tue, 12 Mar 2019 09:02:46 Z<p>The UW&ndash;Madison School of Education and many of its programs continue to be recognized as being among the very best in the nation. </p> <p>U.S. News and World Report released its <a href="https://www.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-education-schools" title="View the rankings at usnews.com" target="_blank">2020 Best Education Graduate Schools rankings</a> on March 12, and UW-Madison is home to the highest-rated public school of education in the nation, a distinction it is sharing this year with the University of California-Los Angeles. </p> <p>UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s School of Education is No. 3 overall, trailing only Ivy League privates Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania. UW&ndash;Madison, UCLA, and Stanford University all tied for the No. 3 spot.</p> <p>This marks the 20th time in the past 21 years that UW-Madison has maintained a top-10 ranking among all schools of education.</p> <p><img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/soerank2020_sitefinity-350x528.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="UW-Madison tied for top public school ranking by U.S. News 2020" title="SoERank2020_Sitefinity 350x528" class="FloatImageRight" />&ldquo;It is an honor to again be recognized as one of the finest schools of education by U.S. News and World Report,&rdquo; says UW-Madison School of Education Dean Diana Hess, the Karen A. Falk Distinguished Chair of Education. &ldquo;While these rankings are but one measure, they are special because they recognize the collective contributions of our many talented and dedicated faculty and staff. The depth of our highly regarded programs is a great strength of ours.&rdquo;</p> <p>In addition to this overall rank, UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s School of Education is also home to nine specialty programs ranked among the top 10 in the nation &mdash; including the top-ranked program in rehabilitation counseling, which is housed within the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education.</p> <p>"We are honored and humbled by such a prestigious recognition,&rdquo; says UW-Madison Associate Professor Melinda Leko, who chairs the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education. &ldquo;It is a testament to the dedication and excellence exemplified by our faculty, staff, students, and alumni who are working tirelessly every day to improve outcomes for individuals with disabilities within our society.&rdquo;</p> <p>According to these latest rankings, the UW&ndash;Madison School of Education is home to top-10 programs in the following specialty areas: </p> <p><strong>&bull;&nbsp;No. 1 &mdash;</strong>&nbsp;Rehabilitation Counseling</p> <p><strong>&bull; No. 2 &mdash;</strong> Curriculum and Instruction</p> <p><strong>&bull; No. 2 &mdash;</strong> Educational Administration and Supervision</p> <p><strong>&bull; No. 2 &mdash;</strong> Educational Psychology</p> <p><strong>&bull; No. 3 &mdash;</strong> Education Policy</p> <p><strong>&bull; No. 3 &mdash;</strong> Student Counseling and Personnel Services</p> <p><strong>&bull; No. 4 &mdash;</strong> Elementary Education</p> <p><strong>&bull;&nbsp;No. 5 &mdash;</strong> Secondary Education</p> <p><strong>&bull; No. 8 &mdash;</strong> Special Education </p> <p>UW-Madison also ranked 20th in the specialty area of Higher Education Administration.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageLeft"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/educbldg-doors-350-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Education Building" displaymode="Original" title="EducBldg doors 350 px" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">The UW&ndash;Madison School of Education has maintained a<br /> top-10 ranking among all schools of education 20 times in<br /> the past 21 years, according to U.S. News and World Report.</figcaption> </figure> </div> To calculate its overall 2020 Best Graduate School rankings, U.S. News explains that it sent surveys to 392 institutions granting doctoral degrees in the fall of 2018 and early 2019. Of those, 258 provided data needed to calculate rankings based on a weighted average of 10 measures. These measures include: peer assessments based on surveys filled out by education school deans and deans of graduate studies; professional assessments based on responses from school superintendents, school hiring contacts and professionals who hire people who graduate from graduate education programs; student selectivity measures, such as GRE scores and acceptance rates; faculty resource measures; and research activity. (<a href="https://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/articles/education-schools-methodology" title="learn more at usnews.com" target="_blank">View details about U.S. News' methodology here</a>.)</p> <p>These most recent overall rankings make UW-Madison home to the top-rated public school of education for the fifth time in the past six years.</p> <p>U.S. News explains that the education program specialty rankings are &ldquo;based solely on nominations by education school deans and education school deans of graduate studies from the list of schools surveyed.&rdquo; Those participating could select up to 10 top programs in each area. Similarly, the UW-Madison School of Education&rsquo;s top ranking in the <a href="https://www.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-health-schools/rehabilitation-counseling-rankings" title="Learn more at usnews.com" target="_blank">Rehabilitation Counseling specialty area</a> came from surveys provided by program directors and faculty in health disciplines.</p> <p>Not all graduate programs are ranked by U.S. News &amp; World Report each year. For example, the School of Education&rsquo;s Art Department is home to the top-ranked printmaking program and the 15th-ranked fine arts program (as voted on by deans and department chairs in the fine arts). The Department of Kinesiology, meanwhile, houses the 14th-ranked occupational therapy program (as voted on by program directors and faculty in health disciplines). However, updated rankings in those areas were not included in U.S. News&rsquo; 2020 Best Graduate Schools rankings.</p>urn:uuid:0523c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/02/08/regents-approve-new-health-promotion-and-health-equity-degree-program Regents approve new health promotion and health equity degree programUW-Madison's new bachelor of science in health promotion and health equity (HPHE) program will be housed in the School of Education's Department of Kinesiology. This program responds to student interest and employer demand for health-related expertise and health education careers, and will be run in collaboration with the School's Departments of Counseling Psychology, and Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education.Fri, 08 Feb 2019 15:50:36 Z<p>The University of Wisconsin System&rsquo;s Board of Regents voted Friday to approve a new undergraduate degree program at UW&ndash;Madison in health promotion and health equity. </p> <p>The development of the program responds to student interest and employer demand for health-related expertise and health education careers.</p> <p>The bachelor of science in health promotion and health equity (HPHE) will be housed in the School of Education&rsquo;s Department of Kinesiology. The program will be run in collaboration with two other units within the School, the Department of Counseling Psychology and the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education. </p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/gary-diffee-250-px-sq.jpeg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Gary Diffee" displaymode="Original" title="Gary Diffee 250 px SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Diffee </figcaption> </figure> </div> &ldquo;The Department of Kinesiology is excited to be launching this venture,&rdquo; says Professor Gary Diffee, who chairs the department. &ldquo;This program will fill a real need to train students at the bachelor&rsquo;s degree level to immediately work in the growing fields of health education. Our collaboration with the departments of Counseling Psychology and Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education will allow us to offer students a holistic exposure to health education &mdash; focusing on the physical, the psychological and the socio-cultural aspects of health.&rdquo;</p> <p>This new major will launch with classes starting in September and will train students to practice as health educators. The program is broadly designed to provide students with the skills and perspectives to facilitate healthy practices at the individual and societal levels. Students will learn about the theoretical, programmatic and empirical foundations of health promotion and health equity interventions, and be taught to demonstrate competence in evaluating strengths and weaknesses in health promotion programs. </p> <p>The HPHE program &mdash; which is expected to enroll about 230 students by the 2022-23 academic year &mdash; also reflects a long-standing commitment by the School of Education to engage with disadvantaged communities, as graduates will be taught the skills to work effectively with diverse and underserved populations.</p> <p>The coursework will help prepare students for emerging career opportunities as health educators within: non-profit community health organizations; insurance companies; hospitals; mental health centers; senior care centers; home visitation programs; and governmental health offices. </p> <p>This undergraduate degree will be comprised of 120 credits, including 40 credits in the major. The core coursework includes a balanced focus on the interrelated areas of physical health, mental health, and disability. Elective curriculum will allow students to tailor the major in the direction of their personal interests.</p> <p>Students may enroll directly to the HPHE program as current UW-Madison students, or upon admission to the university as new freshmen or new transfer students. Typically, students will start the major in their second year, and remain enrolled through a third and fourth year.</p> <p><em>For more information about the bachelor of science in health promotion and health equity, email: <a href="mailto:HPHE@education.wisc.edu" title="Email the health promotion and health equity program">HPHE@education.wisc.edu</a></em></p> <div class="FloatImageLeft"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://rpse.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/kinesiology-lab-for-soe-site.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Kinesiology Lab" displaymode="Original" title="Kinesiology Lab for SoE Site" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">UW-Madison's new bachelor of science in health promotion and health equity (HPHE) program will be housed in the School of Education's Department of Kinesiology. This program responds to student interest and employer demand for health-related expertise and health education careers, and will be run in collaboration with the School's Departments of Counseling Psychology, and Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education. (<em>Photo: Sarah Maughan</em>)</figcaption> </figure> </div>urn:uuid:411ac237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://rpse.education.wisc.edu/rpse/news/2019/02/04/kim-selected-as-intern-for-wisconsin-council-for-exceptional-children-s-executive-board Kim selected as intern for Wisconsin Council for Exceptional Children’s executive boardUW-Madison’s Kristina Kim was recently selected as the student intern for the Wisconsin Council for Exceptional Children’s (CEC) executive board. The CEC is a professional association of educators working to advance the success of children with exceptionalities. Kim is a master’s degree student in special education with the School of Education’s Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education.Mon, 04 Feb 2019 11:01:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Kristina Kim was recently selected as the student intern for the Wisconsin Council for Exceptional Children&rsquo;s (CEC) executive board. <br /> <br /> The CEC is a professional association of educators working to advance the success of children with exceptionalities. They do so through advocacy, implementing standards, and professional development.&nbsp;</p> <p>Kim is a master&rsquo;s degree student in special education with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://rpse.education.wisc.edu/" title="RPSE home page" target="_blank">Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>As an intern on the board, Kim will have access to excellent leadership and professional development opportunities and receive a two-year membership to the CEC. The purpose of this internship program is to connect with higher education institutions.</p>